How I'm Finishing My Wrap Edges

Discussion in 'The Builders Workshop' started by GeeDeeEmm, Mar 11, 2019.

  1. GeeDeeEmm

    GeeDeeEmm Well-Known Member

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    I have only one more drum to do in my Slingerland rewrap project, and it just dawned on me that I've taken practically no pictures along the way so that I could post the project here. So, here's just a very few photos of the finishing project.

    Quick history: Brand new (NOS) Slingerland Concert King kit, 5pc, maple shells in deep red mahogany gloss finish. To this kit I added a Radio King maple 18" floor tom with cast hoops and a Radio King 10" tom, again with cast hoops, and a maple 3-ply Slingerland snare - with cast hoops. OK.

    The Original NOS Kit

    Slingerland Drumset 2018 020.jpg

    The Almost-Finished Expanded and Rewrapped Kit
    Slingerland Concert King Rewrapped 037.JPG

    The lovely WMP Slingerland/Delmar wrap was applied with petroleum-based Weldwood "Original" Contact Cement. After doing the 18" tom with a 1/4" recess (which I didn't like), I've done the remainder of the kit with (nearly) flush edges that contour with the bearing edges.

    To accomplish this, I've been cutting the wrap with 1.5" excess over the edges, which makes it easy to use a new razor knife to cut the wrap even with the outer bearing edge. Once that is done, the following finishing process was undertaken.

    Once the wrap was trimmed back with the razor knife, I used a flat Bastard file to shape it to the contour of the bearing edge:
    Slingerland Wrap Edges 001.JPG

    From the file, I then used 180 grit automotive orbital sander paper, which does well in resisting clogging:
    Slingerland Wrap Edges 002.JPG

    I could have gone from 180 grit to 220, but the results were already quite satisfactory, and I didn't really find it necessary, as the contour is very nice and the smoothness is fine. I'm happy with these.
    Slingerland Wrap Edges 003.JPG
    The overlap recess happens quite naturally with the file, and allows the heads to seat and spin easily.
    Slingerland Wrap Edges 005.JPG
    Slingerland Wrap Edges 007.JPG

    GeeDeeEmm
     
  2. Fat Drummer

    Fat Drummer Very well Known Member

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    Just wonderful work! You have killed this kit project, cant with to see it all finished and in its full glory!
     
  3. idrum4fun

    idrum4fun DFO Veteran

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    Excellent job on the edge finishing! It's time consuming, but this is how it should be done!
    Attached are two pictures of my 2016 Ludwig Classic Maple snare drum and my 2017 Gretsch USA Custom snare drum. Big difference in how each company does the edges...or lack of!

    -Mark
     

    Attached Files:

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  4. Rockin' Billy

    Rockin' Billy DFO Veteran

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    Nice job! Filing those edges is very time consuming and slightly nerve wracking 1st time out.
     
  5. GeeDeeEmm

    GeeDeeEmm Well-Known Member

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    Thank you, good sir. The pictured tom is the 10" that I just got from John Ollis, so all I have left to do is a snare drum. I can't decide exactly which one I want to do.

    GeeDeeEmm
     
  6. GeeDeeEmm

    GeeDeeEmm Well-Known Member

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    They are. The Concert King badges were as thin as foil and easily wrinkled during the removal, so I replaced them with new Conway cloud badges.

    By the way, each drum is being clearly (and permanently) marked inside as to its origin so that no subsequent owners will be confused about where these came from. I'll never sell them, but after I die, the markings will clearly identify them.

    GeeDeeEmm
     
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  7. GeeDeeEmm

    GeeDeeEmm Well-Known Member

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    You got that right, Billy. And no room for error.

    GeeDeeEmm
     
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  8. Old Dog

    Old Dog Well-Known Member

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    Great description and visual aides, lol. I'm glad to see this, I'm considering some wrapping soon. THanks
     
  9. JazzDrumGuy

    JazzDrumGuy DFO Master

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    Wow, great looking - that looks very hard to do......

    Stupid question - I assume you wrap first, then cut the wrap, then file? Or can you cut the wrap to size first, file it, then apply it? Seems like you could for toms, but not snares as you have to cut for the bearing edge.....
     
  10. Rockin' Billy

    Rockin' Billy DFO Veteran

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    No questions are stupid, that’s how we learn. When I did it(and have wrapped quite a few kits but not for years now)I had the wrap cut to size for each drum(by Precision Drum.)which is close w/overlap) Then apply to drum, cut wrap ‘close-er,’ and then file down.
     
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  11. GeeDeeEmm

    GeeDeeEmm Well-Known Member

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    You can do it either way, JDG. In fact, the first tom's wrap was cut to size first, then applied - and I didn't like it. Even though I allowed for some error, the wrap had to be applied with absolute precision, and on a large drum that becomes increasingly difficult to do. Especially when you have only ONE shot at getting it right!

    So, on the subsequent wraps, I cut the wrap with a full 1.5" overhang beyond each bearing edge - just in case. This worked out perfectly, and was much easier to do. So, the wrap is applied, then cut back to the lower extension of the bearing edge with a NEW razor knife (the orange ones). The Bastard file is used to contour the wrap edge to the same profile as the bearing edge. This could be done with 180 grit sandpaper, as well, but would take a significantly longer time. So I just shaped the wrap edge, then did the final blending with the sandpaper.

    Covering a snare drum would entail exactly the same process, but I would cut the snare beds portion with the paper only. The file is too aggressive for such a small and important cutout. The paper would allow one to cut the beds quite finely. This is one area, too, that I would finish with 220 grit paper rather than 180.

    GeeDeeEmm
     
  12. GeeDeeEmm

    GeeDeeEmm Well-Known Member

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    Forgot to reply to this one. No, it is not hard to do. Time consuming, yes, but hard? Not really. Anybody with even a hint of mechanical abilities, along with good YouTube tutorials, can do this.

    If this was the first time I'd ever done this job, I would request some scraps from a rewrap guy and practice with them on wood. Once you do that, you will see just how easy it is and you'll be inspired to do the "big one."

    GeeDeeEmm
     
  13. GeeDeeEmm

    GeeDeeEmm Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Old Dog!

    Have you ever done wrapping before? Or any kind of veneering? If so, you will be good to go.

    If you and JDG have never done a rewrap before, I'd be happy to send you guys any scraps that I have left so you can practice.

    GeeDeeEmm
     

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